These are some of the leading causes of death in men. Here’s what you need to know about them and what you can do to prevent them.

1. Heart Attack

A heart attack, also known as a myocardial infarction (MI), occurs when one of the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart get blocked, usually because of fat deposits in the blood vessels. The results is damage to part of the heart muscle.

What Can You Do To Prevent It? 1
– Quit smoking
– Exercise regularly — at least 150 minutes of vigorous activity per week
– Lose weight if you’re overweight
– Eat a healthy diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables
– Maintain a normal blood pressure
– Maintain normal blood sugars
– Maintain normal cholesterol

When Should You See Your Doctor?
If you have no idea what your blood pressure, blood sugar or cholesterol levels are or if you’re overweight, smoke or have a family history of heart attacks, it’s a good idea to see your doctor. Also, if you’ve had chest pain that’s brought on by physical activity, let your doctor know.

2. Diabetes Mellitus Type 2

Diabetes mellitus Type 2 is a disease where your blood sugar level is higher than normal. Normally, all the cells in our body need sugar. They’re able to take in sugar from the blood stream using a hormone called insulin. If the body doesn’t make enough insulin or if the body stops responding to insulin, the cells cannot take in sugar and thus there is too much sugar in the blood.

Why Is It A Problem? 3
Untreated diabetes can lead to a whole host of medical problems including erectile dysfunction, eye damage and blindness, heart attacks, stroke, kidney disease and loss of feeling in the hands and feet. It can also lead to infections in the hands and feet necessitating amputation.

What Can You Do To Prevent It? 2
– Make sure you’re not overweight. If you are, work to lose weight
– Exercise regularly — at least 150 minutes of vigorous activity per week
– Eat a healthy diet
– Quit smoking
– Maintain a normal blood pressure
– Maintain normal cholesterol

3. Colon Cancer

Colon cancer develops when cells in the large intestine become abnormal and start growing out of control. It’s the third leading cause of death in men but with the right screening it can be preventable.

What Can You Do To Prevent It? 5
Make sure to get screened. Physicians use tests to detect polyps, or non-cancerous growths, before symptoms begin. Removing polyps early prevents cancer from developing and spreading.
– Exercise regularly 6
– Eat a healthy diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables
– Avoid eating red meats or processed meats too frequently
– Quit smoking

4. Lung Cancer

Lung cancer occurs when cells in the lungs become abnormal and start growing out of control. It is the leading cause of cancer deaths but also one of the most preventable.

What Can You Do To Prevent It? 7
Don’t smoke. Almost 90 percent of lung cancers are caused by cigarettes. This includes exposure to second-hand smoke. Even if you’ve been smoking for most of your life, quitting now can help reduce your change of lung cancer significantly. Reducing exposure to certain substances such as asbestos and radon can also help reduce lung cancer risk.

5. Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer occurs when cells in the prostate become abnormal and start growing out of control. The prostate gland sits below the bladder and helps to make fluid that is part of semen. It is a very common cancer in men over the age of 50.8

What Can You Do About It?
Talk to your doctor about the right screening test for you. See your doctor if you have a family history of prostate cancer or have experienced decreased flow of urination, difficulty urinating, urinating more at night, blood in the urine, increased urgency or burning with urination.

6. High Blood pressure

Blood pressure is the pressure of our blood in the circulatory system. This should normally be 120/80. If your blood pressure is over 140/90, you have high blood pressure. In many ways, high blood pressure is a silent killer as many men have it for years and don’t know it, while it silently damages their blood vessels. This is one of the leading causes of stroke and can also lead to heart attacks and kidney disease.

What Can You Do About It? 9
See your doctor to have your blood pressure checked
– If you’re overweight, lose weight
– Cut down on the amount of salt you eat
– Reduce alcohol — less than two drinks per day for men
– Eat a healthy diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables
– Exercise regularly — at least 150 minutes of vigorous activity a week

7. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

COPD is a disease of the airways of the lungs that makes it hard to breath. It’s progressive, which means it gets worse with time. It makes people cough and feel short of breath and increases the risk of lung infections like pneumonia, heart problems and lung cancer.

What Can You Do To Prevent It? 10
Quit smoking! Regardless how much you smoke or how long you’ve been smoking, quitting will reduce your chances of getting COPD and slow down the progression if you already have it. If you’re having problems quitting, see your doctor, who will provide you with different smoking cessation strategies.

8. Stroke

Strokes are one of the leading causes of death in the world. A stroke happens when part of the brain no longer gets oxygen and starts to die. This happens either because of a blockage causing a lack of blood flow or because a blood vessel in the brain breaks open, causing a leakage of blood. The effect of a stroke varies depending on how severe it is and which part of the brain is damaged. Some people have no long-term effects but others are left unable to speak or partly paralyzed on one side of their body.

What Can You Do To Prevent It? 11
– Exercise regularly — at least 150 minutes of vigorous activity per week
– Quit Smoking
– Lose weight if you’re overweight
– Eat a healthy diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables
– Maintain a normal blood pressure
– Maintain normal blood sugars
– Maintain normal cholesterol

9. Depression

Depression is a serious medical problem that impacts the way you think and feel. It causes feelings of sadness that are different from normal sadness. It’s a serious threat to men’s health because suicide remains one of the leading causes of death in men.

What Can You Do About It? 12
If you’ve been experiencing these symptoms, see your doctor.
– Feeling sad, down or hopeless most days
– Losing interest in things you used to like to do
– Sleeping too much or not enough
– Feelings of guilt or worthlessness
– Change in appetite and weight
– Feeling tired
– Difficulty concentrating

10. Testicular Cancer

Testicular cancer is the most common cause of cancer in young men, occurring most often between the ages of 15 and 35. It happens when cells in the testicles become abnormal and start growing out of control. Testicular cancer has few known preventable risk factors.

What Can You Do About It? 13
Watch for symptoms such as pain in your scrotum or testicles or an achy, heavy feeling in your abdomen or scrotum. It is recommended to do monthly checks of your testicles in the shower when they are warm and relaxed. Always see your doctor if you feel a lump or any other abnormalities in your testicles.

Works Cited

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10. Eisner MD, Anthonisen N, Coultas D, Kuenzli N, Perez-Padilla R, Postma D, Romieu I, Silverman EK, Balmes JR, Committee on Nonsmoking COPD, Environmental and Occupational Health Assembly  An official American Thoracic Society public policy statement: Novel risk factors and the global burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. AM J Respir Crit Care Med. 2010;182(5):693.
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